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Final Fantasy X HD is 70% complete, FFX-2 at 50% By Erren Van Duine on March 26, 2013 at 7:51 AM

By now you might have heard the news that Final Fantasy X (and X-2) are both being remastered for the PS3 and PS Vita.

Such a project was announced in 2011, after all. Only now have they resurfaced, appearing on a single disc and two cartridges respectively – the latter due to space reasons according to Famitsu magazine.

As with any game using HD elements these days, assets done come cheap or small, for that matter. Character models, enemies textures and environments have been revamped and given the size of each game, simply cannot fit on a single Vita card.

Tetsuya Nomura has his hands in the project as well, apparently. According to him, the team is currently researching the possibility of including cross data share between the PS3 and Vita versions (much like Metal Gear Solid HD). Nomura was talking with Final Fantasy Type-0 voice actors during the time of recording about their memories of Final Fantasy X as the two games shared some voice actors. It’s from here that Square Enix decided to do a HD remastering of the games.

This was all around 2011 when production on Final Fantasy XIII-2 was nearing completion, so it took some extra time to shift the manpower to this project. Final Fantasy X producer Yoshinori Kitase said that since they missed out on the 10th Anniversary of FFX, they’ll try to honor the 10th Anniversary of Final Fantasy X-2 instead.

Kitase also mentioned that the team had difficulty taking the assets from the original game for this remaster – stating that one programmer was responsible for salvaging most of the data — but an outsourced team was called in to help on the project. Anything that couldn’t be transferred from the original had to be created from scratch. The Visual Works team, specifically Kazuyuki Ikomori, was also called in to give the game’s cinematics a a new look in proper widescreen resolution.

Sound quality has been improved as well – the game will rely on streaming its music from the disc instead of using the console’s sound chip. This doesn’t mean that there are more live instruments recording (it could be though), but at the very least we’ll get higher-quality synths.

Closing the interview, Kitase said he hopes that younger fans will be able to enjoy Final Fantasy X. The game itself currently stands at 70% complete, with X-2 slightly behind at 50%, and will be released later this year worldwide.

Via: FF-Reunion, FF World.

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